Rocio’s Moles de los Dióses – Chilaquiles

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How many times have you seen chilaquiles on a Mexican menu, and wondered what it was? Here’s what Wikipedia says:

Chilaquiles (Spanish pronunciation: [tʃila’kiles]) from the Nahuatl word chīlāquilitl [t͡ʃiːlaː’kilit͡ɬ] is a traditional Mexican dish. Typically, corn tortillas cut in quarters and lightly fried are the basis of the dish.[1] Green or red salsa or mole is poured over the crisp tortilla triangles, called totopos. The mixture is simmered until the tortilla starts softening. Eggs (scrambled or fried) and pulled chicken are sometimes added to the mix. The dish is topped with cheese (typically queso fresco) and/or sweet Mexican cream (crema), and it is served with refried beans. As with many Mexican dishes, regional and familial variation is quite common.

In central Mexico it is common for the tortilla chips to remain crisp. To achieve this, all ingredients except the salsa are placed on a plate and the salsa is poured at the last moment, seconds before serving. It is commonly garnished with cream, shredded queso fresco, raw onion rings and avocado slices.
Usually, chilaquiles are eaten at breakfast or brunch. This makes them a popular recipe to use leftover tortillas and salsas.
Chilaquiles are frequently confused with the Tex-Mex Migas, as each is a dish that uses tortilla chips/strips served primarily in the morning. In Guadalajara, cazuelas are kept simmering filled with chilaquiles that become thick in texture similar to polenta.

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