Bowie – Mexico City… Cocina de Humo

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When I landed in Colonia Roma, my favorite neighborhood in Mexico City, I was faced with a dilemma. How do you decide where to eat when there are at least 2 cool-looking restaurants on every block? But I had recently seen an article listing restaurants that served marrow bones. Now, I have no interest in marrow bones, but I associate them with high-end restaurants, and figured that any chef who has the confidence to do something creative with them has to be good at a lot things.

That’s how I chose Bowie. I might have been put off by the large portrait of David Bowie, and the fact that they were playing “Let’s Dance” as I arrived (no, in fact, I hadn’t made the obvious connection to the singer), but it’s a lovely room, it was raining out, and I was convinced the food was going to be good. I was right.

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I was greeted warmly, and things started well when they brought fresh pita with a drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkle of tasty spices.

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A dish I always enjoy in Mexico is called Fideo Seco, a dish that usually just lives up to its name – dry noodles. Bowie’s version is much more elaborate and flavorful than I was expecting, with bright tomato and olive flavors, and a beautiful presentation. Definitely not your grandmother’s fideo seco, and absolutely delicious.

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The main course was a tough decision, but I went with the short ribs. I was expecting the usual braised meat falling off the bone, but was pleasantly surprised when I was presented with a huge iron skillet with a large serving of tender, smoky meat (well, the restaurant does describe itself as Cocina de Humo) beautifully assembled with mashed potato and squash, and a lovely beefy sauce.

It was a great experience, and I know I will be returning on my next Mexico City trip.

Here’s the contact info:

Bowie
Cordoba 113, Col. Roma – C.P. 06700, CDMX
Telephone: 5264 2622

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So… What did you eat in Mexico City?

My friends know I’m always on the lookout for great food, so one of their first questions when I return from a trip is “What did you eat?” Here are some highlights from my recent Mexico City trip.

Chiles en Nogada – Cafe Tacuba, Centro

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Hotcakes – Sobrinos, Colonia Roma

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Pozole – Casa de Toño, Zona Rosa

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Tacos al Pastor “Especial” – El Huequito, Centro

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Grilled Octopus – Los Danzantes, Coyoacán

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Fideo Seco – Bowie, Colonia Roma

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Barbacoa – El Hidalguense, Colomia Roma

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Birria Jalisqueña – Tacos Frontera, Colonia Roma

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Deciphering Mexico City’s Metro Icons

Mexico Affordable Travel

For anyone who has wondered about the strange symbols that mark the subway stops in Mexico City, the answers are finally revealed… I only figured out pyramid symbol at the Pino Suárez station, and the observatory symbol at the Observatorio staton.

Here’s the article from Citylab:

http://www.citylab.com/design/2016/04/deciphering-mexico-citys-metro-icons/479796/?utm_source=SFFB

The Backlash to Mexico City’s High Line-Style Park

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It sounds as if the critics have a good point, but this could be one of the nicest urban park spaces in the world… Right through Colonia Roma, my favorite neighborhood in Mexico City. Or anywhere else, for that matter.

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Here’s the article from CityLab’s website… These photos are taken from the article.

80 Things You Should Do in Mexico City

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Here’s a piece I found on the website MXCITY Guía Insider. The photos are all from the website.

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I’m not usually a big fan of tour guides, but this is something special, with links throughout the article that provide a really in-depth picture of the huge variety of activities that are available in one of the greatest cities in the world.

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Divided into sections, the categories are:

Walking – with links to interesting places by neighborhood, including parks, monuments and spectacular views

Food – linking famous restaurants as well as interesting places for tacos and street food. It mentions Cafe Tacuba or Casa Cardinal, but also doesn’t forget the best ice cream and chocolate shops.

Night Life – with links to recommended clubs and other activities, from dance clubs, cantinas to hookah bars.

Shopping – from high end to the crazy rambling marketplaces.

Art and Culture – ranging from galleries and museums to weekend bazaars.

Magic Places – places unique to the city, including special gardens and parks, unusual buildings and picturesque plazas.

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Here’s the link: http://mxcity.mx/2015/05/turista-en-tu-ciudad-80-cosas-que-debes-hacer-en-la-ciudad-de-mexico/

Mexico City’s 10 Most Exclusive Restaurants

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The website The Happening recently listed their selection of the 10 most exclusive restaurants in Mexico City. It’s interesting to see The Palm and Nobu on the list, as I have been to these wonderful restaurants in Los Angeles (and several other cities in the case of The Palm), and didn’t feel especially exclusive – although I might have talked myself into it if I had been in that frame of mind. It’s also interesting to see a strong Japanese influence on the list. For me, though, I can’t wait for my next trip to Mexico City to try the haute cuisine versions of traditional Mexican dishes.

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Here’s the list – yes, they cheated and listed 11 restaurants:

Pujol – Recently ranked at number 16 among the world’s best restaurants

Biko – Based on the Basque tradition

Anatol – A farm-to-table concept

Dulce Patria – Traditional Mexican cuisine with an original touch

San Angel Inn – Based on Mexican traditions, but making room on the menu for Oysters Rockefeller

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J & G Grill – Asian French fusion

Morimoto – Another international outpost featuring traditional Japanese cuisine with western touches

The Palm – Steaks and gigantic lobsters… what’s not to like?

Au Pied du Cochon – French high cuisine

Nobu – American bistro food with a creative Japanese influence

Quintonil – Another entrant in the 50 best restaurants of the world. Based on traditional Mexican cuisine

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Here’s the entire article from The Happening: http://thehappening.com/los-diez-restaurantes-mas-exclusivos-en-el-df/ (The photos are from the article)